Time For A New Install Guide

13 10 2009

As much as I’d wanted to be clear, it seems that my EFI guide fails to live to my (and others’) expectations.

I’ll be back with a new one EFI guide, hopefully this one’s less of a pain in the @$$ as the current one.

And while I do that, I think it’s time I cleared up my act and stick to a single site and stop confusing my own already befuddled brain.

My MacBook Mini

Advertisements




Snow Leopard EFI Vanilla – part 1

27 09 2009

Because we’re insatiable. And because I’ll forget everything I did so I gotta post it here to remind me.

This is based on 18seven’s guide at msiwind.net. I just repackaged stuff to customize it for the HP Mini 1000.

Create a bootable Snow Leopard External HDD installer

Ingredients : a hackintosh/real Mac, Snow Leopard Retail DVD.dmg image, external hard drive (at least 8 gb free space) and >> SnowLeo_EFIboot package (contains everything needed in this how-to; except of course the Snow Leo Retail DVD)

A. Restore Snow Leopard Retail DVD image onto the external HDD.

1. With your drive (USB/External HDD) plugged in, launch Disk Utility (Applications > Utilities) and format it as GPT (GUID Partition Table) + Mac OS Extended Journaled. Let’s assume we’d named the HDD partition as “Mac OS X Install DVD”.

2. Still in Disk Utility, click on the Restore tab. Drag the Snow Leo image (”Snow Leopard.dmg”) into the Source field. Then drag “Mac OS X Install DVD” partition into the Destination: field. Click on the Restore button and wait until the process completes. Quit Disk Utility. Note: If the Snow Leo Retail DVD image is not listed at the left pane, simply drag the image there from a Finder window, or Click on the “Image…” button beside the Source field to navigate to the image’s location in your hard drive.

3. Unzip “SnowLeo_EFIboot”. Doesn’t really matter anywhere as long as you remember where it is. However for more convenience, since where gonna be working with command lines in Terminal, I prefer unzipping it in my / folder. Hence we’ll refer to /SnowLeo_EFIboot directory in this how-to guide.

B. Make your external HDD bootable

1. In Terminal, key in the following commands, pressing Enter at the end of each line. Also use Tab to autofill out paths for you.

sudo -s (type in your admin account’s password)

diskutil list

> You’ll see a list of all drives connected to your computer. At this point, it’s important to take note of what your external HDD is called. The internal HDD, where your current running system is installed, is usually labelled as “/dev/disk0” with its partitions following suit like “/dev/disk0s1“, “/dev/disk0s2“, etc. External drives are labelled as “/dev/disk1“, “/dev/disk2” etc. with each’s partitions named “/dev/disk1s1. . ./dev/disk1s2” or “/dev/disk2s1. . ./dev/disk2s2” respectively.

So you’ve formatted your external HDD as GPT, and with the one partition you created named “Mac OS X Install DVD” where Snow Leo installer image is restored on, you’ll see something similar to this:

this isnt the actual stuff youd see in Terminal - I forgot to screenshot it

this isn't the actual stuff you'd see in Terminal - I forgot to screenshot it

Note: “Mac OS X Install DVD” is actually labelled as “/dev/disk1s2” cause there’s already another partition labelled as “EFI” which is your “/dev/disk1s1”. The main point is, EFI is always suffixed by “s1”. Now back to being a command-line junky – or an aspiring command-line junky.

newfs_hfs -v EFI /dev/disk1s1

mkdir /Volumes/EFI

mount_hfs /dev/disk1s1 /Volumes/EFI

mkdir -p /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Extensions

mkdir /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Themes

> You’ve just formatted, mounted the EFI partition and created the file structure you need. This is what you should have seen in Terminal:

_

cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r658-bin/i386

fdisk -f boot0 -u -y /dev/rdisk1

dd if=boot1h of=/dev/rdisk1s1

cp boot /Volumes/EFI

> You’ve just installed Chameleon v2.0 RC3 bootloader onto the EFI partition. This is what you should’ve seen in Terminal:

_

cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r568-bin/OptionalExtras

cp -R smbios.plist Themes /Volumes/EFI/Extra

> You’ve just added in additional files to your EFI partition; smbios.plist and a theme for Chameleon bootloader. This is what you should’ve seen in Terminal:

umount -f /Volumes/EFI

rm -rf /Volumes/EFI

> This unmounts EFI so we don’t get weird/funny terminal messages later when we run the scripts.

cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts

./27ae.sh

> You’ve just patched the video kexts to make them work. This is what you should’ve seen in Termninal:

_

./update-1s1.sh

> You’ve just loaded the kexts you need, including the patched video kexts, for Snow Leo. If your external HDD isn’t disk1s1, I’ve included another script for those working with disk2s1 “update-2s1.sh”. Actually, you could just copy the original “update.sh” in the /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts folder (courtesy of 18seven’s genius) and change “disk0s1” to your own EFI partition label. This is what should’ve seen in Terminal:

_

cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Bootplist

./update-1s1.sh

> This adds a the Boot.plist to EFI. Again, you can use the ./update-2s1.sh script that’s also included, or you can edit the script to match your setup. This is what should’ve seen in Terminal:

_

fdisk -e /dev/disk1

p

f 1 (space between “f” and “1”)

w

y

q

> This makes the EFI partition active. You should’ve seen something like this in terminal:

_

You have just made a bootable Snow Leo Installer from your external HDD and configured EFI boot at the same time.

This will also serve as your external bootloader from here on.

To be continued in Part 2

Create a bootable Snow Leopard USB/External HDD installer
Ingredients : a hackintosh/real Mac, Snow Leopard Retail DVD.dmg image, external hard drive (at least 8 gb free space) and
>> SnowLeo_EFIboot package (contains everything needed in this how-to; except of course the Snow Leo Retail DVD)
A. Restore Snow Leopard Retail DVD image onto the external HDD.
1. With your drive (USB/External HDD) plugged in, launch Disk Utility (Applications > Utilities) and format it as GPT (GUID Partition Table) + Mac OS Extended Journaled. Let’s assume we’d named the HDD partition as “Mac OS X Install DVD”.
2. Still in Disk Utility, click on the Restore tab. Drag the Snow Leo image (”Snow Leopard.dmg”) into the Source field. Then drag “Mac OS X Install DVD” partition into the Destination: field. Click on the Restore button and wait until the process completes. Quit Disk Utility. Note: If the Snow Leo Retail DVD image is not listed at the left pane, simply drag the image there from a Finder window, or Click on the “Image…” button beside the Source field to navigate to the image’s location in your hard drive.
3. Unzip “SnowLeo_EFIboot”. Doesn’t really matter anywhere as long as you remember where it is. However for more convenience, since where gonna be working with command lines in Terminal, I prefer unzipping it in my / folder. Hence we’ll refer to /SnowLeo_EFIboot directory in this how-to guide.
B. Make external HDD bootable
1. In Terminal, key in the following commands, pressing Enter at the end of each line. Also use Tab to autofill out paths for you.
sudo -s
(type in your admin account’s password)
diskutil list
> You’ll see a list of all drives connected to your computer. At this point, it’s important to take note of what your external HDD is called.
The internal HDD, where your current running system is installed, is usually labelled as “/dev/disk0” with its partitions following suit like “/dev/disk0s1”, “/dev/disk0s2”, etc.
External drives are labelled as “/dev/disk1”, “/dev/disk2” etc. with each’s partitions named “/dev/disk1s1. . ./dev/disk1s2” or “/dev/disk2s1. . ./dev/disk2s2” respectively.
So you’ve formatted your external HDD as GPT, and with the one partition you created named “Mac OS X Install DVD” where Snow Leo installer image is restored on, you’ll see something similar to this:
Note: “Mac OS X Install DVD” is actually labelled as “/dev/disk1s2” cause there’s already another partition labelled as “EFI” which is your “/dev/disk1s1”. The main point is, EFI is always suffixed by “s1”. Now back to being a command-line junky – or an aspiring command-line junky.
newfs_hfs -v EFI /dev/disk1s1
mkdir /Volumes/EFI
mount_hfs /dev/disk1s1 /Volumes/EFI
mkdir -p /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Extensions
mkdir /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Themes
> You’ve just formatted, mounted the EFI partition and created the file structure you need.
This is what you should have seen in Terminal: [1 part A]
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r658-bin/i386
fdisk -f boot0 -u -y /dev/rdisk1
dd if=boot1h of=/dev/rdisk1s1
cp boot /Volumes/EFI
> You’ve just installed Chameleon v2.0 RC3 bootloader onto the EFI partition.
This is what you should’ve seen in Terminal: [1 part B]
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r568-bin/OptionalExtras
cp -R smbios.plist Themes /Volumes/EFI/Extra
> You’ve just added in additional files to your EFI partition; smbios.plist and a theme for Chameleon bootloader.
This is what you should’ve seen in Terminal: [1 part C]
umount -f /Volumes/EFI
rm -rf /Volumes/EFI
> This unmounts EFI so we don’t get weird/funny terminal messages later when we run the scripts.
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./27ae.sh
> You’ve just patched the video kexts to make them work.
This is what you should’ve seen in Termninal: [2 part A]
./update-1s1.sh
> You’ve just loaded the kexts you need, including the patched video kexts, for Snow Leo. If your external HDD isn’t disk1s1, I’ve included another script for those working with disk2s1 “update-2s1.sh”. Actually, you could just copy the original “update.sh” in the /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts folder (courtesy of 18seven’s genius) and change “disk0s1” to your own EFI partition label.
This is what should’ve seen in Terminal: [2 part B]
> Now, time to add a the Boot.plist to EFI:
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Bootplist
./update-1s1.sh
> Again, you can use the ./update-2s1.sh script that’s also included, or you can edit the script to match your setup.
This is what should’ve seen in Terminal: [2 part C]
fdisk -e /dev/disk1
p
f 1 (space between “f” and “1”)
w
y
q
> This makes EFI active.
You should’ve seen something like this in terminal: [3 part A]
You have just made a bootable Snow Leo Installer from your external HDD and configured EFI boot at the same time.
This will also serve as your external bootloader from here on.
B. Install Snow Leopard onto the HP Mini
1. With the USB installer plugged in, switch on the Mini and press F9 as it starts. You’ll see the boot menu screen. Use the up/down arrow keys to choose your USB Installer from the list and hit the Enter key. Wait until Darwin finish its countdown and boot “Mac OS X Install DVD” partition and get you into the Installer Program.
2. Choose your preferred language etc. On the Menubar, go to Utilities > Disk Utility. Format the Mini’s internal HDD as GUID & Mac OS Extended (Journaled). Let’s assume it’s named as “Macintosh HD”. Quit Disk Utility.
3. Choose Mac HD as the destination partition for installation. You can click on the Customize button at the lower left corner to specify which components you want to install. Note: Normally, I opt to exclude printer drivers, all other languages, X11 to save more hard disk real estate and include Rosetta (for MS Office:Mac, it isn’t Universal binary yet) and QuickTime Player 7, but it’s all up to you.
4. Click on OK, then click on the Install button the start installing Mac OS X on the HP Mini. Walk around, grab some Starbucks, read a book, anything – just don’t try to blow dry your hair anywhere near the HP Mini while it’s installing OS X hahaha . The HP Mini will restart after it’s finished installing. Note: The Installer program might tell you that the installation failed. Don’t worry about that – it’s just saying the system it has just installed can’t be restarted. But we have an external bootloader made just for that.
Post-Installation
A. Initial Snow Leopard boot and user account creation.
1. With your external bootloader still plugged in, hit F9 as the Mini starts up, choose your external HDD and press Enter. Chameleon will kick in but before the countdown is over, press any key. Arrow key to choose “Macintosh HD” (where you’ve just installed Snow Leo on your Mini’s internal HDD) and then Enter.
> Now here’s a somewhat tricky part where most of us part ways. If you get through the Setup Assistant fine and configured your user account (normally you’d even see the Welcome video and with audio at that) then jump to part B of this Post-Installation. However, if you get stuck then:
2. Force restart the Mini. F9 and arrow up/down to choose your external HDD and let Chameleon boot again into the the “Mac OS X Install DVD”. Choose your preferred language and once you see the Menu bar, go to Utilities > Reset password. Enter a password for root and remember that password. Quit the Mac OS X Install program and restart the Mini.
3. Again, with your external bootloader still plugged in, hit F9 as the Mini starts up, choose your external HDD and press Enter. Chameleon will kick in but before the countdown is over, press any key. Arrow key to choose “Macintosh HD”. Type in “root” as user name and the password you created earlier, login and configure your user account.
B. Make your HP Mini able to boot Snow Leopard up on its own
1. As you’re logged into Snow Leo with your user account, unzip “SnowLeo_EFIboot” package. Again, we’re assuming it’s been put in / for easier typing in Terminal. Actually, we’re just gonna do what we did a while ago (or a long while ago depending on your experience) with your external HDD to make it bootable, albeit with some changes. But these are very very minor changes.
2. Setup your EFI partition. Launch Terminal:
sudo -s
(type in your admin account’s password)
diskutil list
> Remember what we talked about earlier? Your Mini’s HDD will normally be referenced as “/dev/disk0”. Since we’ve formatted it during install as GPT (GUID partition table), you’d see an “EFI /dev/disk0s1” entry before your “Macintosh HD /dev/disk0s2”.
This is that very very minor change I was talking about; you’re just gonna be changing all the “/dev/disk1s1” or “/dev/disk2s1” references you used before to “/dev/disk0s1”.
(You’ve done this before, you can definitely do this again. :D)
newfs_hfs -v EFI /dev/disk0s1
mkdir /Volumes/EFI
mount_hfs /dev/disk0s1 /Volumes/EFI
mkdir -p /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Extensions
mkdir /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Themes
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r658-bin/i386
fdisk -f boot0 -u -y /dev/rdisk0
dd if=boot1h of=/dev/rdisk0s1
cp boot /Volumes/EFI
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r568-bin/OptionalExtras
cp -R smbios.plist Themes /Volumes/EFI/Extra
umount -f /Volumes/EFI
rm -rf /Volumes/EFI
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./27ae.sh
> We used the update-1s1.sh script before, so now we’ll use the default “update.sh” scripts (thanks again to 18seven for this)
./update.sh
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Bootplist
./update.sh
fdisk -e /dev/disk0
p
f 1
w
y
q
Your MacBook Mini has been Snow Leopardized and is now bootable but we’d want to tweak further; ex. sleep, UUID etc.
C. Tweaks and Stuff
Download TextWrangler and install it.
1. Enable Sleep.
-While still on sudo inside Terminal:
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/DSDT
./update.sh
> This installs dspassmor’s dsdt.aml that enables sleep on the Mini.
2. Cnfigure your UUID.
– Get your ethernet’s MAC address via System Profiler > Network (in Leopard). Cmd+C to copy the MAC address.
– In Finder, open /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts, right click UUID.kext > Show package contents. In the resulting window, in Contents folder, open info.plist with TextWrangler.
– In TextWrangler, locate “UUID-key” and replace the last set of numbers in the string below by pasting your MAC address over. Delete all the “:” colons. Save changes to info.plist. [http://photoshroom.com/photos/dixneuf/efi_snowleo/UUID_infoplist_MACadd.png]
– Go back to Terminal:
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./update.sh
> This loads your newly edited UUID.kext onto EFI.
3. Configure Boot plist
– Get your “Macintosh HD” partition’s Universal Unique Identifier via Disk Utility > right click “Macintosh HD” > Information. Cmd+C to copy the number.
– In Finder, go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Bootplist and open com.apple.Boot.plist with TextWrangler. Then create a new key after the “device-properties” in the file. Save the changes to com.apple.Boot.plist. [http://photoshroom.com/photos/dixneuf/efi_snowleo/comappleBootplist_UnivUniqueID.png]
– Go back to Terminal:
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Bootplist
./update.sh
> This updates your com.apple.Boot.plist on your EFI partition.
4. Trackpad (Default; ApplePS2Controller).
– Go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/PrefPanes/Synaptics and “Synaptics Trackpad.prefPane” to /Library/PreferencePanes/
> This ensures that you get a Trackpad pref pane in System Preferences if you decided to stick with the default ApplePS2Controllers.
5. Trackpad (VoodooPS2Controller).If you wanna switch to VoodooPS2Controllers, then
– Go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/OtherKexts and copy VoodooPS2Controller and VoodooPS2Trackpad kexts to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts. Put ApplePS2Controller and AppleACPIPS2Nub kexts to into /SnowLeo_EFIboot/_disabled/ folder. Go back to Terminal:
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./update.sh
– Go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/PrefPanes/VoodooPrefs and double click on VoodooPS2.prefPane to install it.
6. Tweak VoodooHDA.
– Install by double-clickng VoodooHDA.prefPane in /SnowLeo_EFIboot/PrefPanes/VoodooPrefs
– Install by double-clicking voodoohdahelper in /SnowLeo_EFIboot/PrefPanes/VoodooPrefs/helper
7. Transform your Mini into a MacBook Air.
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/MBAsmbiosplsit
./update.sh
8. Install ClamshellDisplay.
– In Finder, go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/ClamShellDisplay and copy ClamshellDisplay.kext to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts.
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./update.sh
> This loads this kext to EFI to keep your 100% Vanilla setup.
– Or you can directly install it to /System/Library/Extensions. That’ll leave you with a 99.9% Vanilla install.
9. Update to 10.6.1
– Download, install the updater and before restarting, go to Terminal:
sudo -s
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./27ae.sh
> This re-patches the video drivers – only as a precautionary measure in case something happens after the point update; we just wanna be sure.
Now what?
You’ve got a working MacBook Mini with Snow Leopard. You’re also EFI booting so if you wanna make changes – swap kexts, etc – you don’t have to muck with the /System/Library/Extensions folder anymore, leaving you with a solid, stable system. All changes are made in the EFI partition.
Also the update scripts are very handy (again kudos to 18seven for making them). Should you wanna change a component in EFI, go and dump the new kext in the “HPMiniKexts” folder, moving any conflicting kexts in the “_disabled” folder within, and finally, in Terminal, cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts and ./update.sh.
For the other components, it’s basically the same principle – copy/edit the component in the appropriate folder and then update in Terminal.
Ex. dsdt’s go to the “DSDT” folder, com.apple.Boot.plist goes to the “Biosplist” folder in the SnowLeo_EFIboot main.
And then if you’re quite up to it, get to the DSDT patching/hacking route. Make the jump to this link to read up on the topic.Create a bootable Snow Leopard USB/External HDD installer
Ingredients : a hackintosh/real Mac, Snow Leopard Retail DVD.dmg image, external hard drive (at least 8 gb free space) and
>> SnowLeo_EFIboot package (contains everything needed in this how-to; except of course the Snow Leo Retail DVD)
A. Restore Snow Leopard Retail DVD image onto the external HDD.
1. With your drive (USB/External HDD) plugged in, launch Disk Utility (Applications > Utilities) and format it as GPT (GUID Partition Table) + Mac OS Extended Journaled. Let’s assume we’d named the HDD partition as “Mac OS X Install DVD”.
2. Still in Disk Utility, click on the Restore tab. Drag the Snow Leo image (”Snow Leopard.dmg”) into the Source field. Then drag “Mac OS X Install DVD” partition into the Destination: field. Click on the Restore button and wait until the process completes. Quit Disk Utility. Note: If the Snow Leo Retail DVD image is not listed at the left pane, simply drag the image there from a Finder window, or Click on the “Image…” button beside the Source field to navigate to the image’s location in your hard drive.
3. Unzip “SnowLeo_EFIboot”. Doesn’t really matter anywhere as long as you remember where it is. However for more convenience, since where gonna be working with command lines in Terminal, I prefer unzipping it in my / folder. Hence we’ll refer to /SnowLeo_EFIboot directory in this how-to guide.
B. Make external HDD bootable
1. In Terminal, key in the following commands, pressing Enter at the end of each line. Also use Tab to autofill out paths for you.
sudo -s
(type in your admin account’s password)
diskutil list
> You’ll see a list of all drives connected to your computer. At this point, it’s important to take note of what your external HDD is called.
The internal HDD, where your current running system is installed, is usually labelled as “/dev/disk0” with its partitions following suit like “/dev/disk0s1”, “/dev/disk0s2”, etc.
External drives are labelled as “/dev/disk1”, “/dev/disk2” etc. with each’s partitions named “/dev/disk1s1. . ./dev/disk1s2” or “/dev/disk2s1. . ./dev/disk2s2” respectively.
So you’ve formatted your external HDD as GPT, and with the one partition you created named “Mac OS X Install DVD” where Snow Leo installer image is restored on, you’ll see something similar to this:
Note: “Mac OS X Install DVD” is actually labelled as “/dev/disk1s2” cause there’s already another partition labelled as “EFI” which is your “/dev/disk1s1”. The main point is, EFI is always suffixed by “s1”. Now back to being a command-line junky – or an aspiring command-line junky.
newfs_hfs -v EFI /dev/disk1s1
mkdir /Volumes/EFI
mount_hfs /dev/disk1s1 /Volumes/EFI
mkdir -p /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Extensions
mkdir /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Themes
> You’ve just formatted, mounted the EFI partition and created the file structure you need.
This is what you should have seen in Terminal: [1 part A]
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r658-bin/i386
fdisk -f boot0 -u -y /dev/rdisk1
dd if=boot1h of=/dev/rdisk1s1
cp boot /Volumes/EFI
> You’ve just installed Chameleon v2.0 RC3 bootloader onto the EFI partition.
This is what you should’ve seen in Terminal: [1 part B]
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r568-bin/OptionalExtras
cp -R smbios.plist Themes /Volumes/EFI/Extra
> You’ve just added in additional files to your EFI partition; smbios.plist and a theme for Chameleon bootloader.
This is what you should’ve seen in Terminal: [1 part C]
umount -f /Volumes/EFI
rm -rf /Volumes/EFI
> This unmounts EFI so we don’t get weird/funny terminal messages later when we run the scripts.
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./27ae.sh
> You’ve just patched the video kexts to make them work.
This is what you should’ve seen in Termninal: [2 part A]
./update-1s1.sh
> You’ve just loaded the kexts you need, including the patched video kexts, for Snow Leo. If your external HDD isn’t disk1s1, I’ve included another script for those working with disk2s1 “update-2s1.sh”. Actually, you could just copy the original “update.sh” in the /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts folder (courtesy of 18seven’s genius) and change “disk0s1” to your own EFI partition label.
This is what should’ve seen in Terminal: [2 part B]
> Now, time to add a the Boot.plist to EFI:
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Bootplist
./update-1s1.sh
> Again, you can use the ./update-2s1.sh script that’s also included, or you can edit the script to match your setup.
This is what should’ve seen in Terminal: [2 part C]
fdisk -e /dev/disk1
p
f 1 (space between “f” and “1”)
w
y
q
> This makes EFI active.
You should’ve seen something like this in terminal: [3 part A]
You have just made a bootable Snow Leo Installer from your external HDD and configured EFI boot at the same time.
This will also serve as your external bootloader from here on.
B. Install Snow Leopard onto the HP Mini
1. With the USB installer plugged in, switch on the Mini and press F9 as it starts. You’ll see the boot menu screen. Use the up/down arrow keys to choose your USB Installer from the list and hit the Enter key. Wait until Darwin finish its countdown and boot “Mac OS X Install DVD” partition and get you into the Installer Program.
2. Choose your preferred language etc. On the Menubar, go to Utilities > Disk Utility. Format the Mini’s internal HDD as GUID & Mac OS Extended (Journaled). Let’s assume it’s named as “Macintosh HD”. Quit Disk Utility.
3. Choose Mac HD as the destination partition for installation. You can click on the Customize button at the lower left corner to specify which components you want to install. Note: Normally, I opt to exclude printer drivers, all other languages, X11 to save more hard disk real estate and include Rosetta (for MS Office:Mac, it isn’t Universal binary yet) and QuickTime Player 7, but it’s all up to you.
4. Click on OK, then click on the Install button the start installing Mac OS X on the HP Mini. Walk around, grab some Starbucks, read a book, anything – just don’t try to blow dry your hair anywhere near the HP Mini while it’s installing OS X hahaha . The HP Mini will restart after it’s finished installing. Note: The Installer program might tell you that the installation failed. Don’t worry about that – it’s just saying the system it has just installed can’t be restarted. But we have an external bootloader made just for that.
Post-Installation
A. Initial Snow Leopard boot and user account creation.
1. With your external bootloader still plugged in, hit F9 as the Mini starts up, choose your external HDD and press Enter. Chameleon will kick in but before the countdown is over, press any key. Arrow key to choose “Macintosh HD” (where you’ve just installed Snow Leo on your Mini’s internal HDD) and then Enter.
> Now here’s a somewhat tricky part where most of us part ways. If you get through the Setup Assistant fine and configured your user account (normally you’d even see the Welcome video and with audio at that) then jump to part B of this Post-Installation. However, if you get stuck then:
2. Force restart the Mini. F9 and arrow up/down to choose your external HDD and let Chameleon boot again into the the “Mac OS X Install DVD”. Choose your preferred language and once you see the Menu bar, go to Utilities > Reset password. Enter a password for root and remember that password. Quit the Mac OS X Install program and restart the Mini.
3. Again, with your external bootloader still plugged in, hit F9 as the Mini starts up, choose your external HDD and press Enter. Chameleon will kick in but before the countdown is over, press any key. Arrow key to choose “Macintosh HD”. Type in “root” as user name and the password you created earlier, login and configure your user account.
B. Make your HP Mini able to boot Snow Leopard up on its own
1. As you’re logged into Snow Leo with your user account, unzip “SnowLeo_EFIboot” package. Again, we’re assuming it’s been put in / for easier typing in Terminal. Actually, we’re just gonna do what we did a while ago (or a long while ago depending on your experience) with your external HDD to make it bootable, albeit with some changes. But these are very very minor changes.
2. Setup your EFI partition. Launch Terminal:
sudo -s
(type in your admin account’s password)
diskutil list
> Remember what we talked about earlier? Your Mini’s HDD will normally be referenced as “/dev/disk0”. Since we’ve formatted it during install as GPT (GUID partition table), you’d see an “EFI /dev/disk0s1” entry before your “Macintosh HD /dev/disk0s2”.
This is that very very minor change I was talking about; you’re just gonna be changing all the “/dev/disk1s1” or “/dev/disk2s1” references you used before to “/dev/disk0s1”.
(You’ve done this before, you can definitely do this again. :D)
newfs_hfs -v EFI /dev/disk0s1
mkdir /Volumes/EFI
mount_hfs /dev/disk0s1 /Volumes/EFI
mkdir -p /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Extensions
mkdir /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Themes
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r658-bin/i386
fdisk -f boot0 -u -y /dev/rdisk0
dd if=boot1h of=/dev/rdisk0s1
cp boot /Volumes/EFI
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r568-bin/OptionalExtras
cp -R smbios.plist Themes /Volumes/EFI/Extra
umount -f /Volumes/EFI
rm -rf /Volumes/EFI
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./27ae.sh
> We used the update-1s1.sh script before, so now we’ll use the default “update.sh” scripts (thanks again to 18seven for this)
./update.sh
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Bootplist
./update.sh
fdisk -e /dev/disk0
p
f 1
w
y
q
Your MacBook Mini has been Snow Leopardized and is now bootable but we’d want to tweak further; ex. sleep, UUID etc.
C. Tweaks and Stuff
Download TextWrangler and install it.
1. Enable Sleep.
-While still on sudo inside Terminal:
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/DSDT
./update.sh
> This installs dspassmor’s dsdt.aml that enables sleep on the Mini.
2. Cnfigure your UUID.
– Get your ethernet’s MAC address via System Profiler > Network (in Leopard). Cmd+C to copy the MAC address.
– In Finder, open /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts, right click UUID.kext > Show package contents. In the resulting window, in Contents folder, open info.plist with TextWrangler.
– In TextWrangler, locate “UUID-key” and replace the last set of numbers in the string below by pasting your MAC address over. Delete all the “:” colons. Save changes to info.plist. [http://photoshroom.com/photos/dixneuf/efi_snowleo/UUID_infoplist_MACadd.png]
– Go back to Terminal:
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./update.sh
> This loads your newly edited UUID.kext onto EFI.
3. Configure Boot plist
– Get your “Macintosh HD” partition’s Universal Unique Identifier via Disk Utility > right click “Macintosh HD” > Information. Cmd+C to copy the number.
– In Finder, go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Bootplist and open com.apple.Boot.plist with TextWrangler. Then create a new key after the “device-properties” in the file. Save the changes to com.apple.Boot.plist. [http://photoshroom.com/photos/dixneuf/efi_snowleo/comappleBootplist_UnivUniqueID.png]
– Go back to Terminal:
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Bootplist
./update.sh
> This updates your com.apple.Boot.plist on your EFI partition.
4. Trackpad (Default; ApplePS2Controller).
– Go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/PrefPanes/Synaptics and “Synaptics Trackpad.prefPane” to /Library/PreferencePanes/
> This ensures that you get a Trackpad pref pane in System Preferences if you decided to stick with the default ApplePS2Controllers.
5. Trackpad (VoodooPS2Controller).If you wanna switch to VoodooPS2Controllers, then
– Go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/OtherKexts and copy VoodooPS2Controller and VoodooPS2Trackpad kexts to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts. Put ApplePS2Controller and AppleACPIPS2Nub kexts to into /SnowLeo_EFIboot/_disabled/ folder. Go back to Terminal:
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./update.sh
– Go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/PrefPanes/VoodooPrefs and double click on VoodooPS2.prefPane to install it.
6. Tweak VoodooHDA.
– Install by double-clickng VoodooHDA.prefPane in /SnowLeo_EFIboot/PrefPanes/VoodooPrefs
– Install by double-clicking voodoohdahelper in /SnowLeo_EFIboot/PrefPanes/VoodooPrefs/helper
7. Transform your Mini into a MacBook Air.
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/MBAsmbiosplsit
./update.sh
8. Install ClamshellDisplay.
– In Finder, go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/ClamShellDisplay and copy ClamshellDisplay.kext to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts.
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./update.sh
> This loads this kext to EFI to keep your 100% Vanilla setup.
– Or you can directly install it to /System/Library/Extensions. That’ll leave you with a 99.9% Vanilla install.
9. Update to 10.6.1
– Download, install the updater and before restarting, go to Terminal:
sudo -s
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./27ae.sh
> This re-patches the video drivers – only as a precautionary measure in case something happens after the point update; we just wanna be sure.
Now what?
You’ve got a working MacBook Mini with Snow Leopard. You’re also EFI booting so if you wanna make changes – swap kexts, etc – you don’t have to muck with the /System/Library/Extensions folder anymore, leaving you with a solid, stable system. All changes are made in the EFI partition.
Also the update scripts are very handy (again kudos to 18seven for making them). Should you wanna change a component in EFI, go and dump the new kext in the “HPMiniKexts” folder, moving any conflicting kexts in the “_disabled” folder within, and finally, in Terminal, cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts and ./update.sh.
For the other components, it’s basically the same principle – copy/edit the component in the appropriate folder and then update in Terminal.
Ex. dsdt’s go to the “DSDT” folder, com.apple.Boot.plist goes to the “Biosplist” folder in the SnowLeo_EFIboot main.
And then if you’re quite up to it, get to the DSDT patching/hacking route. Make the jump to this link to read up on the topic.




Homecoming

20 08 2009

or is it leaving home?

Anyhoo, MacBook Mini has a new home:

click on image to go to the new blog

click on image to go to the new blog





Battery, Battery

14 08 2009

from Slim Battery site

You’ve just successfully installed Mac OS X Leopard on your precious Mini, gotten out alive from a proliferation of how-to-guides all a-jumble that you’d scourged high and low from the world wide web so you’re updated to 10.5.7 or 10.5.8.

And in the pursuit of that ever ellusive happiness, you tweak your MacBook Mini to your tastes and one of the nuisances you take care of aside from the pesky resolution that would almost always break at every update (save those video kexts under “Break In Case of Update” glass), is that equally pesky warning message that tells you that:

“You are now running on reserve power.”

blah blah blah

You’ve just unhooked your MacBook Mini from the mains just a few minutes ago and that 80% charge remaining can in no means be insufficient to run your spanking hackintosh-netbook. No way.

For the longest time, I’ve always opted to disable battery warning messages (System Preferences > Energy Saver – you just dig around there 😉 ) and then take out the default battery icon from the Menubar. So off it has always gone to oblivion with a disgruntled poof of cartoonish smoke, never again to be summoned to grace my hackintosh computing view. I’ve always replaced it with Slim Battery.

But because of reasons unfathomable even to myself, I wanna be able to use the default battery menulet (yes, according to Mac OS X Leopard, The Missing Manual, that’s what you call those icons sitting on your Menubar). I find that the iDeneb patches found in /…/system/Installation/Packages/Patches of the iDeneb installer disc extremely interesting.

If you’re on kernel 9.7.0, that is kernel from 10.5.7 (cause you may be on 10.5.8 but using this kernel to get sleep/resume), you can install the iDeneb PowerManagement.pkg patch and forget about Slim Battery altogether.

We may or may not have the same results but it seems to have eliminated that warning message pest. Just apply the package after installing the usual kexts (VoodooPower and VoodooBattery).





Update or Downdate (what a word)?

8 08 2009

The “About This Mac” pane tells me it’s 10.5.8 alright. But I’m missing something I never thought would be valuable – sleep/resume.

It appears that 10.5.8’s kernel is the one causing sleep/resume problems, so after several failures (word of caution – do NOT delete Disabler.kext. . .ever); a number of which caused me kernel panics and consequently reinstallation of the whole lot in attempting to recover sleep/resume functionality from MacBook Mini. Here’s what I did:

This is assuming you’re already running Mac OS X on 10.5.7 (VoodooPS2Controller already installed + Patched DSDT + OSx86Essentials applied beforehand).

1) Backed up mach_kernel 9.7.0 (that’s 10.5.7’s kernel). In Terminal:

$ sudo cp /mach_kernel /Volumes/JET/   <Enter>

(Just substitute the path to where you want your 10.5.7 kernel to be copied to)

2) Installed Disabler.kext and dsmos.kext

3) Backed up system.kext and seatbelt.kext. Just go to /System/Library/Extensions and copy these two kexts to a folder or USB drive or anywhere safe.

4) Ran MacOSX10.5.8Update (delta) – this would over write your 10.5.7 kernel in my/.

5) Restart. Back in my desktop, launched Terminal:

$ sudo cp /Volumes/JET/mach_kernel /  <Enter>

(again, it’s up to you to alter the path as appropriate)

6)Via Kext Helper b7 again, installed the usual kexts these and these plus the system.kext and seatbelt.kext I’d backed up earlier. Restarted and now I have everything working, including sleep.

Don’t have those 10.5.7 files anymore? If you’re on the hp mini 1001tu as well (they may work with other models as well, you can try), here are the mach_kernel, system.kext, and seatbelt.kext from my 10.5.7 installation. You can use “ShowAllFiles” which is included in the .zip file so you can easily see mach_kernel (which is invisible) and just drag drop it to your /.

Actually, just replacing kernel 9.8.0 with 9.7.0 would do the trick. However, that gave me problems with mounting USB peripherals – flashdrives and external hard drives to be more precise; they won’t mount unless I plug them in during boot up. Installing 10.5.7’s system.kext and seatbelt.kext resolved this issue for me.

So I’m it is Mac OS X 10.5.8 but I’m using kernel 9.7.0 as well as system and seatbelt kexts from 10.5.7. . . is this an update or a downdate*?

in Terminal, type uname -r to verify kernel version

in Terminal, type uname -r to verify kernel version: 10.5.8 should be 9.8.0, here it's 9.7.0 which is 10.5.7's kernel version

*sorry for the grammar issue there, I would’ve used the words upgrade and update but according to Apple, “update” and “upgrade” are not one and the same word. Updates are incremental support iterations that are downloadable for free from their support sections, i.e. 10.5.x updates to 10.5.1. .2, .3, .4, . . , .8. While 10.0, 10.2,. .., 10.4 upgrade to 10.5.x…okay, that wasn’t so good at all and I may have addled your brains more instead of making stuff clear so just read the article:

Software update, upgrade–what’s the difference?

Oh and I think that new iDisk icon is cute – it’s now blue or blue green like Snow Leopard’s 😀

yes, I notice little details like that 😉





And the Never Ending Saga Continues. . .

6 08 2009

Edit: Sleep/Resume has been resolved. Read it here.

First off, you can call me Hermione Granger-ish all you want, before taking the 10.5.8 plunge, I did some research, or to be more honest, some googling around 😉 and found this interesting website.

NOTE: This is assuming you’ve already a working iDeneb install updated upto 10.5.7 – dsdt patched, OSx86_Essentials kexts applied, and Chameleon RC02. (I haven’t checked how things would go on PCI_EFI Chameleon 1.0.12).

And like any bookworm out there who easily believes what she reads, (1) I obediently backed up my Extensions via Terminal:

$ sudo -rf /System/Library/Extensions /System/Library/Extensions_1057

Afterward, (2) I installed Disabler and dsmos kexts referenced by the aforementioned website via good ol’ Kext Helper b7 but color-coded them first cause I was too lazy to check whether I had these kexts already or not in my current setup, there’s no way I’d miss those red kexts now if ever I’d need to check later 😀

(3) That done, I didn’t reboot yet but ran the Mac OS X Delta 10.5.8 Updater (Delta because I was running 10.5.7 already, 10.5.6 and lower should get the Combo Updater) I’d downloaded just minutes before from the Apple website which, quite surprisingly, took fairly little time to install at around just 5 minutes or less.

I originally intended to reinstall VoodooPS2Controller just in case but decided at the last minute not to and (4) just hit Restart as Installer completed the update. As expected the first reboot didn’t complete and the Mini restarted and once again I was face to face with Chameleon RC02 (I’ve updated my bootloader to the latest Chameleon, by the way, and am enjoying my OS X Boot Theme which I got from here). Then Darwin said “hi” again. The screen flickered, giving me goosebumps as I thought I’d never get into my beloved Leopard desktop. And the spinning wheel finally sprung into action and after what seemed to be a substantially longer boot time than usual, I first saw nothing but a blue screen. . .and my cursor – whew! Another 5 seconds or so, I was back into my desktop!

But everything was humongous; resolution got bricked as expected.
Perhaps this screenshot could better illustrate what happened after the update:

No BT, WiFi, Resolution 640x480, Color not 32-bit | Has audio, battery

No Bluetooth, WiFi, Resolution 640x480, Color not 32-bit | Has audio, default battery monitor working (right click and open in new tab/window for screenshot's actual size)

It was a comfort to know that screen brightness controls weren’t bricked. As it was nearing midnight already I dimmed the screen to the lowest possible before (5.1) I trudged on, reinstalling my usual kexts via OSx86 Tools and not Kext Helper since unlike the latter (Kext Helper b7 it turns out, also backs up your kexts), OSx86 Tools would create a backup folder of the 10.5.8 kexts it replaced which I wanted to look at after. I started with the system kexts which seems to have restored WiFi and Bluetooth. I had no problems with sound as VoodooHDA still worked after the update.

(5.2) Now for the video kexts. You can opt to reinstall all of the kexts in one go; I just decided to separately install them because (a) they’re already sorted into two different folders in my drive and OSx86 only allows installing 1 folder of kexts at a time and (b) I’m just weird that way. Restarted and bingo!

Bluetooth, WiFi (Airport), Audio, Battery, 1024 x 600 32-bit

Bluetooth, WiFi (Airport), Audio, Battery, 1024 x 600 32-bit (right click and open in new tab/window screenshot in actual size)

There was that nasty “You are running on reserve power” battery warning again and in wanting to screenshot it, I tried to make it pop again by putting MacBook Mini to sleep so I closed the lid and it was late when it dawned upon me that the usual flickering of the white power led and switching off of the fan didn’t happen. I reopened the lid and there were the tell-tale signs of a broken Sleep/Resume that were all too familiar to me by then. I knew I had no choice but to force shutdown the Mini and turn it back on so I plugged in my broadband cable to check if ethernet worked. It did. It does.

No need for Yukon2.kext

No need for Yukon2.kext, just be sure to plug in cable before booting up

Now for a summary. At first I thought I was gonna end up listing down the few stuff that still worked but, as it turned out, I’m now writing what doesn’t work which means the general outcome of this experiment isn’t so bad after all:

1) Sleep/Resume – once you put the Mini to sleep either by closing the lid or pressing fn+f1 combo keys, the screen does switch off but so do the trackpad and, I assume, the keyboard as well, never to be woken up again but by forcing the machine to shutdown and just turn it back on again.

2) Fan – it’s gotten hyperactive I guess as it now whirls away with fervent gusto at maximum right from the start and it’s noisy.

I would’ve also listed the battery warning nuissance pop-up alert but that’s easily ignored or resolved by turning off battery warning in System Preferences, taking out the default OS X battery meter from the Menubar (enjoy seeing it vanish in a poof of smoke) and using Slim Battery Monitor instead.

What happened to my 10.5.7’s Extension folder’s back up now? I’m keeping it safe for the meantime as I try to figure out how to resolve the issues mentioned above; the kexts can come quite handy, who knows.

For issue # 1, I’ll have to try the old SleepEnabler kext and/or review VoodooUSBEHCI again for some hints. For issue #2, I’m gonna see how posta74’s fan solution works out on this one.

All of this is actually reminiscent of struggles with previous updates 10.5.6 and 10.5.7, still fresh in my mind – 10.5.8 is déjà vu. Creepy, I know.

And now I’ve turned another fork in the road – Harry Potter’s lightning scar no longer burns; the King has returned to rule the whole of Middle Earth and even Gollum has found his peace and so has Frodo (though I still doubt he’s come out of the closet yet 😉 ) and Luke Skywalker has swung his last light saber – sagas have come to their own grand close yet this hackintoshing journey of mine seems to never end. T_T





August 5, 2009

6 08 2009

While the whole Philippine nation will remember yesterday as one of the most touching events in their history (me included in the “their” there) as they bade farewell to a great woman whose unfailing faith in freedom had fueled minds, fed souls of today who are now enjoying the democracy she helped bring forth, the rest of Apple-dom and Apple fanboys and girls alike will perhaps remember August 5, 2009 as the day that 10.5.8, what may be the last OS X Leopard update before Snow Leopard will be official, was released.

Delta Updater | Combo Updater

While I and my family remained glued to the TV set in the living to pay our respect to this great leader in the only way we could then, my fellow hackintoshers had already downloaded 10.5.8 from Apple’s website and were trying it on their own iterations of MacBook Mini’s each. Thus, when I visited myhpmini.com this morning fresh from grieving my country’s loss of its valuable pillar of society, this was the conversation thread that welcomed me:

> Intel9295
Now, to any HP mini Hackintosh users: DO NOT UPGRADE! This update could break your install. Wait until someone more qualified does it (LeMaurien, we are looking at you) and see’s what it does. YOU’VE BEEN WARNED.

Don’t be stupid.

> MrFairladyz » Wed Aug 05, 2009 11:40 pm
My wifi wasnt working so i just updated to see what changes. So far, the display resolution issue is back (it only shows 640×480 instead of 1024×576… i think this is only a problem on the 110’s, though.)

I’m re-installing all the kexts now.

edit: okay, i’ve re-installed the kexts. wifi is still not working (i don’t know if it will mess up your wifi, but mine wasn’t working to begin with.) Display and everything else is back to normal. No noticable changes, what was this update for?

> ravic » Thu Aug 06, 2009 12:56 am
I was having lot of trouble with Bluetooth PAN, I wonder if this would fix it?
I will wait for some time before attempting to upgrade.

> ConfuzedOne » Thu Aug 06, 2009 1:29 am

Don’t be a chicken.. upgrade you fools! 😛 what’s the worse thing that can happen? 😛

> lukehale » Thu Aug 06, 2009 1:32 am

Only post-upgrade issue I have is my sleep fails to function, and I have to restart if I shut the lid :(. That also means bluetooth doesn’t work because to get it working you have to close and reopen the lid. . . which causes it to sleep. . . which fails. Other than that it is working wonderfully. I will get back to you all if I find a solution to the sleep issue 🙂

Based from these results, it’s basically the same conundrum of issues with hardware rendered non-functional by the update; not unlike what’s happened with the other previous updates, 10.5.6 and 10.5.7. Among the issues, it’s Sleep/Resume that’s bothering me the most but I’m not losing hope – if people found solutions for this and a lot more others in 10.5.6 and 10.5.7, why not in 10.5.8? I haven’t tried for myself the update yet so I find no reason to just dismiss this hurdle as unsurvivable 😉

I can’t wait to get acquainted with 10.5.8. Now if only I hadn’t a regular day job. . .

LABAN!