Snow Leo EFI Boot Guide : Revamped

20 10 2009

Hopefully this one’s a better EFI guide. . .on the HP Mini 1000 (1001TU) of course.

Click image to get to the new guide

Click image to get to the new guide

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Of Trackpads and Other Quirks

14 10 2009

It’s no secret that I’ve had problems with my trackpad – I’d broadcast that little snippet practically in all corners of my cyber existence. Well the good news is make that “I used to have problems with my trackpad“. It’s up and running like its old self again which makes me one happy hackintosher.

Now how did that happen ??

. . .Read more





Time For A New Install Guide

13 10 2009

As much as I’d wanted to be clear, it seems that my EFI guide fails to live to my (and others’) expectations.

I’ll be back with a new one EFI guide, hopefully this one’s less of a pain in the @$$ as the current one.

And while I do that, I think it’s time I cleared up my act and stick to a single site and stop confusing my own already befuddled brain.

My MacBook Mini





Snow Leopard EFI Vanilla – part 3

27 09 2009

Post-Installation

A. Initial Snow Leopard boot and user account creation

1. With your external bootloader still plugged in, hit F9 as the Mini starts up, choose your external HDD and press Enter. Chameleon will kick in but before the countdown is over, press any key. Arrow key to choose “Macintosh HD” (where you’ve just installed Snow Leo on your Mini’s internal HDD) and then Enter.

> Now here’s a somewhat tricky part where most of us part ways. If you get through the Setup Assistant fine and configured your user account (normally you’d even see the Welcome video and with audio at that) then jump to part B of this Post-Installation. However, if you get stuck then:

2. Force restart the Mini. F9 and arrow up/down to choose your external HDD and let Chameleon boot again into the the “Mac OS X Install DVD”. Choose your preferred language and once you see the Menu bar, go to Utilities > Reset password. Enter a password for root and remember that password. Quit the Mac OS X Install program and restart the Mini.

3. Again, with your external bootloader still plugged in, hit F9 as the Mini starts up, choose your external HDD and press Enter. Chameleon will kick in but before the countdown is over, press any key. Arrow key to choose “Macintosh HD”. Type in “root” as user name and the password you created earlier, login and configure your user account.

B. Make your HP Mini able to boot Snow Leopard up on its own

1. As you’re logged into Snow Leo with your user account, unzip “SnowLeo_EFIboot” package. Again, we’re assuming it’s been put in / for easier typing in Terminal. Actually, we’re just gonna do what we did a while ago (or a long while ago depending on your experience) with your external HDD to make it bootable, albeit with some changes. But these are very very minor changes.

2. Setup your EFI partition. Launch Terminal:

sudo -s (type in your admin account’s password)

diskutil list

> Remember what we talked about earlier? Your Mini’s HDD will normally be referenced as “/dev/disk0”. Since we’ve formatted it during install as GPT (GUID partition table), you’d see an “EFI /dev/disk0s1” entry before your “Macintosh HD /dev/disk0s2”. This is that very very minor change I was talking about; you’re just gonna be changing all the “/dev/disk1s1” or “/dev/disk2s1” references you used before to “/dev/disk0s1”.

(You’ve done this before, you can definitely do this again. :D)

newfs_hfs -v EFI /dev/disk0s1

mkdir /Volumes/EFI

mount_hfs /dev/disk0s1 /Volumes/EFI

mkdir -p /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Extensions

mkdir /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Themes

cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r658-bin/i386

fdisk -f boot0 -u -y /dev/rdisk0

dd if=boot1h of=/dev/rdisk0s1

cp boot /Volumes/EFI

cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r658-bin/OptionalExtras

cp -R smbios.plist Themes /Volumes/EFI/Extra

umount -f /Volumes/EFI

rm -rf /Volumes/EFI

cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts

./27ae.sh

> We used the update-1s1.sh script before, so now we’ll use the default “update.sh” scripts (thanks again to 18seven for this)

./update.sh

cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Bootplist

./update.sh

fdisk -e /dev/disk0

p

f 1

w

y

q

Your MacBook Mini has been Snow Leopardized and is now bootable but we’d want to tweak further; ex. sleep, UUID etc.

To be continued to Part 4





Snow Leopard EFI Vanilla – part 2

27 09 2009

Install Snow Leopard onto the HP Mini

1. With the USB installer plugged in, switch on the Mini and press F9 as it starts. You’ll see the boot menu screen. Use the up/down arrow keys to choose your USB Installer from the list and hit the Enter key. Wait until Darwin finish its countdown and boot “Mac OS X Install DVD” partition and get you into the Installer Program.

2. Choose your preferred language etc. On the Menubar, go to Utilities > Disk Utility. Format the Mini’s internal HDD as GUID & Mac OS Extended (Journaled). Let’s assume it’s named as “Macintosh HD”. Quit Disk Utility.

3. Choose Mac HD as the destination partition for installation. You can click on the Customize button at the lower left corner to specify which components you want to install. Note: Normally, I opt to exclude printer drivers, all other languages, X11 to save more hard disk real estate and include Rosetta (for MS Office:Mac, it isn’t Universal binary yet) and QuickTime Player 7, but it’s all up to you.

4. Click on OK, then click on the Install button the start installing Mac OS X on the HP Mini. Walk around, grab some Starbucks, read a book, anything – just don’t try to blow dry your hair anywhere near the HP Mini while it’s installing OS X hahaha . The HP Mini will restart after it’s finished installing.

Note: The Installer program might tell you that the installation failed. Don’t worry about that – it’s just saying the system it has just installed can’t be restarted. But we have an external bootloader made just for that.

To be continued on Part 3





Snow Leopard EFI Vanilla – part 1

27 09 2009

Because we’re insatiable. And because I’ll forget everything I did so I gotta post it here to remind me.

This is based on 18seven’s guide at msiwind.net. I just repackaged stuff to customize it for the HP Mini 1000.

Create a bootable Snow Leopard External HDD installer

Ingredients : a hackintosh/real Mac, Snow Leopard Retail DVD.dmg image, external hard drive (at least 8 gb free space) and >> SnowLeo_EFIboot package (contains everything needed in this how-to; except of course the Snow Leo Retail DVD)

A. Restore Snow Leopard Retail DVD image onto the external HDD.

1. With your drive (USB/External HDD) plugged in, launch Disk Utility (Applications > Utilities) and format it as GPT (GUID Partition Table) + Mac OS Extended Journaled. Let’s assume we’d named the HDD partition as “Mac OS X Install DVD”.

2. Still in Disk Utility, click on the Restore tab. Drag the Snow Leo image (”Snow Leopard.dmg”) into the Source field. Then drag “Mac OS X Install DVD” partition into the Destination: field. Click on the Restore button and wait until the process completes. Quit Disk Utility. Note: If the Snow Leo Retail DVD image is not listed at the left pane, simply drag the image there from a Finder window, or Click on the “Image…” button beside the Source field to navigate to the image’s location in your hard drive.

3. Unzip “SnowLeo_EFIboot”. Doesn’t really matter anywhere as long as you remember where it is. However for more convenience, since where gonna be working with command lines in Terminal, I prefer unzipping it in my / folder. Hence we’ll refer to /SnowLeo_EFIboot directory in this how-to guide.

B. Make your external HDD bootable

1. In Terminal, key in the following commands, pressing Enter at the end of each line. Also use Tab to autofill out paths for you.

sudo -s (type in your admin account’s password)

diskutil list

> You’ll see a list of all drives connected to your computer. At this point, it’s important to take note of what your external HDD is called. The internal HDD, where your current running system is installed, is usually labelled as “/dev/disk0” with its partitions following suit like “/dev/disk0s1“, “/dev/disk0s2“, etc. External drives are labelled as “/dev/disk1“, “/dev/disk2” etc. with each’s partitions named “/dev/disk1s1. . ./dev/disk1s2” or “/dev/disk2s1. . ./dev/disk2s2” respectively.

So you’ve formatted your external HDD as GPT, and with the one partition you created named “Mac OS X Install DVD” where Snow Leo installer image is restored on, you’ll see something similar to this:

this isnt the actual stuff youd see in Terminal - I forgot to screenshot it

this isn't the actual stuff you'd see in Terminal - I forgot to screenshot it

Note: “Mac OS X Install DVD” is actually labelled as “/dev/disk1s2” cause there’s already another partition labelled as “EFI” which is your “/dev/disk1s1”. The main point is, EFI is always suffixed by “s1”. Now back to being a command-line junky – or an aspiring command-line junky.

newfs_hfs -v EFI /dev/disk1s1

mkdir /Volumes/EFI

mount_hfs /dev/disk1s1 /Volumes/EFI

mkdir -p /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Extensions

mkdir /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Themes

> You’ve just formatted, mounted the EFI partition and created the file structure you need. This is what you should have seen in Terminal:

_

cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r658-bin/i386

fdisk -f boot0 -u -y /dev/rdisk1

dd if=boot1h of=/dev/rdisk1s1

cp boot /Volumes/EFI

> You’ve just installed Chameleon v2.0 RC3 bootloader onto the EFI partition. This is what you should’ve seen in Terminal:

_

cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r568-bin/OptionalExtras

cp -R smbios.plist Themes /Volumes/EFI/Extra

> You’ve just added in additional files to your EFI partition; smbios.plist and a theme for Chameleon bootloader. This is what you should’ve seen in Terminal:

umount -f /Volumes/EFI

rm -rf /Volumes/EFI

> This unmounts EFI so we don’t get weird/funny terminal messages later when we run the scripts.

cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts

./27ae.sh

> You’ve just patched the video kexts to make them work. This is what you should’ve seen in Termninal:

_

./update-1s1.sh

> You’ve just loaded the kexts you need, including the patched video kexts, for Snow Leo. If your external HDD isn’t disk1s1, I’ve included another script for those working with disk2s1 “update-2s1.sh”. Actually, you could just copy the original “update.sh” in the /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts folder (courtesy of 18seven’s genius) and change “disk0s1” to your own EFI partition label. This is what should’ve seen in Terminal:

_

cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Bootplist

./update-1s1.sh

> This adds a the Boot.plist to EFI. Again, you can use the ./update-2s1.sh script that’s also included, or you can edit the script to match your setup. This is what should’ve seen in Terminal:

_

fdisk -e /dev/disk1

p

f 1 (space between “f” and “1”)

w

y

q

> This makes the EFI partition active. You should’ve seen something like this in terminal:

_

You have just made a bootable Snow Leo Installer from your external HDD and configured EFI boot at the same time.

This will also serve as your external bootloader from here on.

To be continued in Part 2

Create a bootable Snow Leopard USB/External HDD installer
Ingredients : a hackintosh/real Mac, Snow Leopard Retail DVD.dmg image, external hard drive (at least 8 gb free space) and
>> SnowLeo_EFIboot package (contains everything needed in this how-to; except of course the Snow Leo Retail DVD)
A. Restore Snow Leopard Retail DVD image onto the external HDD.
1. With your drive (USB/External HDD) plugged in, launch Disk Utility (Applications > Utilities) and format it as GPT (GUID Partition Table) + Mac OS Extended Journaled. Let’s assume we’d named the HDD partition as “Mac OS X Install DVD”.
2. Still in Disk Utility, click on the Restore tab. Drag the Snow Leo image (”Snow Leopard.dmg”) into the Source field. Then drag “Mac OS X Install DVD” partition into the Destination: field. Click on the Restore button and wait until the process completes. Quit Disk Utility. Note: If the Snow Leo Retail DVD image is not listed at the left pane, simply drag the image there from a Finder window, or Click on the “Image…” button beside the Source field to navigate to the image’s location in your hard drive.
3. Unzip “SnowLeo_EFIboot”. Doesn’t really matter anywhere as long as you remember where it is. However for more convenience, since where gonna be working with command lines in Terminal, I prefer unzipping it in my / folder. Hence we’ll refer to /SnowLeo_EFIboot directory in this how-to guide.
B. Make external HDD bootable
1. In Terminal, key in the following commands, pressing Enter at the end of each line. Also use Tab to autofill out paths for you.
sudo -s
(type in your admin account’s password)
diskutil list
> You’ll see a list of all drives connected to your computer. At this point, it’s important to take note of what your external HDD is called.
The internal HDD, where your current running system is installed, is usually labelled as “/dev/disk0” with its partitions following suit like “/dev/disk0s1”, “/dev/disk0s2”, etc.
External drives are labelled as “/dev/disk1”, “/dev/disk2” etc. with each’s partitions named “/dev/disk1s1. . ./dev/disk1s2” or “/dev/disk2s1. . ./dev/disk2s2” respectively.
So you’ve formatted your external HDD as GPT, and with the one partition you created named “Mac OS X Install DVD” where Snow Leo installer image is restored on, you’ll see something similar to this:
Note: “Mac OS X Install DVD” is actually labelled as “/dev/disk1s2” cause there’s already another partition labelled as “EFI” which is your “/dev/disk1s1”. The main point is, EFI is always suffixed by “s1”. Now back to being a command-line junky – or an aspiring command-line junky.
newfs_hfs -v EFI /dev/disk1s1
mkdir /Volumes/EFI
mount_hfs /dev/disk1s1 /Volumes/EFI
mkdir -p /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Extensions
mkdir /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Themes
> You’ve just formatted, mounted the EFI partition and created the file structure you need.
This is what you should have seen in Terminal: [1 part A]
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r658-bin/i386
fdisk -f boot0 -u -y /dev/rdisk1
dd if=boot1h of=/dev/rdisk1s1
cp boot /Volumes/EFI
> You’ve just installed Chameleon v2.0 RC3 bootloader onto the EFI partition.
This is what you should’ve seen in Terminal: [1 part B]
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r568-bin/OptionalExtras
cp -R smbios.plist Themes /Volumes/EFI/Extra
> You’ve just added in additional files to your EFI partition; smbios.plist and a theme for Chameleon bootloader.
This is what you should’ve seen in Terminal: [1 part C]
umount -f /Volumes/EFI
rm -rf /Volumes/EFI
> This unmounts EFI so we don’t get weird/funny terminal messages later when we run the scripts.
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./27ae.sh
> You’ve just patched the video kexts to make them work.
This is what you should’ve seen in Termninal: [2 part A]
./update-1s1.sh
> You’ve just loaded the kexts you need, including the patched video kexts, for Snow Leo. If your external HDD isn’t disk1s1, I’ve included another script for those working with disk2s1 “update-2s1.sh”. Actually, you could just copy the original “update.sh” in the /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts folder (courtesy of 18seven’s genius) and change “disk0s1” to your own EFI partition label.
This is what should’ve seen in Terminal: [2 part B]
> Now, time to add a the Boot.plist to EFI:
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Bootplist
./update-1s1.sh
> Again, you can use the ./update-2s1.sh script that’s also included, or you can edit the script to match your setup.
This is what should’ve seen in Terminal: [2 part C]
fdisk -e /dev/disk1
p
f 1 (space between “f” and “1”)
w
y
q
> This makes EFI active.
You should’ve seen something like this in terminal: [3 part A]
You have just made a bootable Snow Leo Installer from your external HDD and configured EFI boot at the same time.
This will also serve as your external bootloader from here on.
B. Install Snow Leopard onto the HP Mini
1. With the USB installer plugged in, switch on the Mini and press F9 as it starts. You’ll see the boot menu screen. Use the up/down arrow keys to choose your USB Installer from the list and hit the Enter key. Wait until Darwin finish its countdown and boot “Mac OS X Install DVD” partition and get you into the Installer Program.
2. Choose your preferred language etc. On the Menubar, go to Utilities > Disk Utility. Format the Mini’s internal HDD as GUID & Mac OS Extended (Journaled). Let’s assume it’s named as “Macintosh HD”. Quit Disk Utility.
3. Choose Mac HD as the destination partition for installation. You can click on the Customize button at the lower left corner to specify which components you want to install. Note: Normally, I opt to exclude printer drivers, all other languages, X11 to save more hard disk real estate and include Rosetta (for MS Office:Mac, it isn’t Universal binary yet) and QuickTime Player 7, but it’s all up to you.
4. Click on OK, then click on the Install button the start installing Mac OS X on the HP Mini. Walk around, grab some Starbucks, read a book, anything – just don’t try to blow dry your hair anywhere near the HP Mini while it’s installing OS X hahaha . The HP Mini will restart after it’s finished installing. Note: The Installer program might tell you that the installation failed. Don’t worry about that – it’s just saying the system it has just installed can’t be restarted. But we have an external bootloader made just for that.
Post-Installation
A. Initial Snow Leopard boot and user account creation.
1. With your external bootloader still plugged in, hit F9 as the Mini starts up, choose your external HDD and press Enter. Chameleon will kick in but before the countdown is over, press any key. Arrow key to choose “Macintosh HD” (where you’ve just installed Snow Leo on your Mini’s internal HDD) and then Enter.
> Now here’s a somewhat tricky part where most of us part ways. If you get through the Setup Assistant fine and configured your user account (normally you’d even see the Welcome video and with audio at that) then jump to part B of this Post-Installation. However, if you get stuck then:
2. Force restart the Mini. F9 and arrow up/down to choose your external HDD and let Chameleon boot again into the the “Mac OS X Install DVD”. Choose your preferred language and once you see the Menu bar, go to Utilities > Reset password. Enter a password for root and remember that password. Quit the Mac OS X Install program and restart the Mini.
3. Again, with your external bootloader still plugged in, hit F9 as the Mini starts up, choose your external HDD and press Enter. Chameleon will kick in but before the countdown is over, press any key. Arrow key to choose “Macintosh HD”. Type in “root” as user name and the password you created earlier, login and configure your user account.
B. Make your HP Mini able to boot Snow Leopard up on its own
1. As you’re logged into Snow Leo with your user account, unzip “SnowLeo_EFIboot” package. Again, we’re assuming it’s been put in / for easier typing in Terminal. Actually, we’re just gonna do what we did a while ago (or a long while ago depending on your experience) with your external HDD to make it bootable, albeit with some changes. But these are very very minor changes.
2. Setup your EFI partition. Launch Terminal:
sudo -s
(type in your admin account’s password)
diskutil list
> Remember what we talked about earlier? Your Mini’s HDD will normally be referenced as “/dev/disk0”. Since we’ve formatted it during install as GPT (GUID partition table), you’d see an “EFI /dev/disk0s1” entry before your “Macintosh HD /dev/disk0s2”.
This is that very very minor change I was talking about; you’re just gonna be changing all the “/dev/disk1s1” or “/dev/disk2s1” references you used before to “/dev/disk0s1”.
(You’ve done this before, you can definitely do this again. :D)
newfs_hfs -v EFI /dev/disk0s1
mkdir /Volumes/EFI
mount_hfs /dev/disk0s1 /Volumes/EFI
mkdir -p /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Extensions
mkdir /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Themes
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r658-bin/i386
fdisk -f boot0 -u -y /dev/rdisk0
dd if=boot1h of=/dev/rdisk0s1
cp boot /Volumes/EFI
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r568-bin/OptionalExtras
cp -R smbios.plist Themes /Volumes/EFI/Extra
umount -f /Volumes/EFI
rm -rf /Volumes/EFI
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./27ae.sh
> We used the update-1s1.sh script before, so now we’ll use the default “update.sh” scripts (thanks again to 18seven for this)
./update.sh
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Bootplist
./update.sh
fdisk -e /dev/disk0
p
f 1
w
y
q
Your MacBook Mini has been Snow Leopardized and is now bootable but we’d want to tweak further; ex. sleep, UUID etc.
C. Tweaks and Stuff
Download TextWrangler and install it.
1. Enable Sleep.
-While still on sudo inside Terminal:
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/DSDT
./update.sh
> This installs dspassmor’s dsdt.aml that enables sleep on the Mini.
2. Cnfigure your UUID.
– Get your ethernet’s MAC address via System Profiler > Network (in Leopard). Cmd+C to copy the MAC address.
– In Finder, open /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts, right click UUID.kext > Show package contents. In the resulting window, in Contents folder, open info.plist with TextWrangler.
– In TextWrangler, locate “UUID-key” and replace the last set of numbers in the string below by pasting your MAC address over. Delete all the “:” colons. Save changes to info.plist. [http://photoshroom.com/photos/dixneuf/efi_snowleo/UUID_infoplist_MACadd.png]
– Go back to Terminal:
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./update.sh
> This loads your newly edited UUID.kext onto EFI.
3. Configure Boot plist
– Get your “Macintosh HD” partition’s Universal Unique Identifier via Disk Utility > right click “Macintosh HD” > Information. Cmd+C to copy the number.
– In Finder, go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Bootplist and open com.apple.Boot.plist with TextWrangler. Then create a new key after the “device-properties” in the file. Save the changes to com.apple.Boot.plist. [http://photoshroom.com/photos/dixneuf/efi_snowleo/comappleBootplist_UnivUniqueID.png]
– Go back to Terminal:
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Bootplist
./update.sh
> This updates your com.apple.Boot.plist on your EFI partition.
4. Trackpad (Default; ApplePS2Controller).
– Go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/PrefPanes/Synaptics and “Synaptics Trackpad.prefPane” to /Library/PreferencePanes/
> This ensures that you get a Trackpad pref pane in System Preferences if you decided to stick with the default ApplePS2Controllers.
5. Trackpad (VoodooPS2Controller).If you wanna switch to VoodooPS2Controllers, then
– Go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/OtherKexts and copy VoodooPS2Controller and VoodooPS2Trackpad kexts to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts. Put ApplePS2Controller and AppleACPIPS2Nub kexts to into /SnowLeo_EFIboot/_disabled/ folder. Go back to Terminal:
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./update.sh
– Go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/PrefPanes/VoodooPrefs and double click on VoodooPS2.prefPane to install it.
6. Tweak VoodooHDA.
– Install by double-clickng VoodooHDA.prefPane in /SnowLeo_EFIboot/PrefPanes/VoodooPrefs
– Install by double-clicking voodoohdahelper in /SnowLeo_EFIboot/PrefPanes/VoodooPrefs/helper
7. Transform your Mini into a MacBook Air.
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/MBAsmbiosplsit
./update.sh
8. Install ClamshellDisplay.
– In Finder, go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/ClamShellDisplay and copy ClamshellDisplay.kext to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts.
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./update.sh
> This loads this kext to EFI to keep your 100% Vanilla setup.
– Or you can directly install it to /System/Library/Extensions. That’ll leave you with a 99.9% Vanilla install.
9. Update to 10.6.1
– Download, install the updater and before restarting, go to Terminal:
sudo -s
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./27ae.sh
> This re-patches the video drivers – only as a precautionary measure in case something happens after the point update; we just wanna be sure.
Now what?
You’ve got a working MacBook Mini with Snow Leopard. You’re also EFI booting so if you wanna make changes – swap kexts, etc – you don’t have to muck with the /System/Library/Extensions folder anymore, leaving you with a solid, stable system. All changes are made in the EFI partition.
Also the update scripts are very handy (again kudos to 18seven for making them). Should you wanna change a component in EFI, go and dump the new kext in the “HPMiniKexts” folder, moving any conflicting kexts in the “_disabled” folder within, and finally, in Terminal, cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts and ./update.sh.
For the other components, it’s basically the same principle – copy/edit the component in the appropriate folder and then update in Terminal.
Ex. dsdt’s go to the “DSDT” folder, com.apple.Boot.plist goes to the “Biosplist” folder in the SnowLeo_EFIboot main.
And then if you’re quite up to it, get to the DSDT patching/hacking route. Make the jump to this link to read up on the topic.Create a bootable Snow Leopard USB/External HDD installer
Ingredients : a hackintosh/real Mac, Snow Leopard Retail DVD.dmg image, external hard drive (at least 8 gb free space) and
>> SnowLeo_EFIboot package (contains everything needed in this how-to; except of course the Snow Leo Retail DVD)
A. Restore Snow Leopard Retail DVD image onto the external HDD.
1. With your drive (USB/External HDD) plugged in, launch Disk Utility (Applications > Utilities) and format it as GPT (GUID Partition Table) + Mac OS Extended Journaled. Let’s assume we’d named the HDD partition as “Mac OS X Install DVD”.
2. Still in Disk Utility, click on the Restore tab. Drag the Snow Leo image (”Snow Leopard.dmg”) into the Source field. Then drag “Mac OS X Install DVD” partition into the Destination: field. Click on the Restore button and wait until the process completes. Quit Disk Utility. Note: If the Snow Leo Retail DVD image is not listed at the left pane, simply drag the image there from a Finder window, or Click on the “Image…” button beside the Source field to navigate to the image’s location in your hard drive.
3. Unzip “SnowLeo_EFIboot”. Doesn’t really matter anywhere as long as you remember where it is. However for more convenience, since where gonna be working with command lines in Terminal, I prefer unzipping it in my / folder. Hence we’ll refer to /SnowLeo_EFIboot directory in this how-to guide.
B. Make external HDD bootable
1. In Terminal, key in the following commands, pressing Enter at the end of each line. Also use Tab to autofill out paths for you.
sudo -s
(type in your admin account’s password)
diskutil list
> You’ll see a list of all drives connected to your computer. At this point, it’s important to take note of what your external HDD is called.
The internal HDD, where your current running system is installed, is usually labelled as “/dev/disk0” with its partitions following suit like “/dev/disk0s1”, “/dev/disk0s2”, etc.
External drives are labelled as “/dev/disk1”, “/dev/disk2” etc. with each’s partitions named “/dev/disk1s1. . ./dev/disk1s2” or “/dev/disk2s1. . ./dev/disk2s2” respectively.
So you’ve formatted your external HDD as GPT, and with the one partition you created named “Mac OS X Install DVD” where Snow Leo installer image is restored on, you’ll see something similar to this:
Note: “Mac OS X Install DVD” is actually labelled as “/dev/disk1s2” cause there’s already another partition labelled as “EFI” which is your “/dev/disk1s1”. The main point is, EFI is always suffixed by “s1”. Now back to being a command-line junky – or an aspiring command-line junky.
newfs_hfs -v EFI /dev/disk1s1
mkdir /Volumes/EFI
mount_hfs /dev/disk1s1 /Volumes/EFI
mkdir -p /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Extensions
mkdir /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Themes
> You’ve just formatted, mounted the EFI partition and created the file structure you need.
This is what you should have seen in Terminal: [1 part A]
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r658-bin/i386
fdisk -f boot0 -u -y /dev/rdisk1
dd if=boot1h of=/dev/rdisk1s1
cp boot /Volumes/EFI
> You’ve just installed Chameleon v2.0 RC3 bootloader onto the EFI partition.
This is what you should’ve seen in Terminal: [1 part B]
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r568-bin/OptionalExtras
cp -R smbios.plist Themes /Volumes/EFI/Extra
> You’ve just added in additional files to your EFI partition; smbios.plist and a theme for Chameleon bootloader.
This is what you should’ve seen in Terminal: [1 part C]
umount -f /Volumes/EFI
rm -rf /Volumes/EFI
> This unmounts EFI so we don’t get weird/funny terminal messages later when we run the scripts.
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./27ae.sh
> You’ve just patched the video kexts to make them work.
This is what you should’ve seen in Termninal: [2 part A]
./update-1s1.sh
> You’ve just loaded the kexts you need, including the patched video kexts, for Snow Leo. If your external HDD isn’t disk1s1, I’ve included another script for those working with disk2s1 “update-2s1.sh”. Actually, you could just copy the original “update.sh” in the /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts folder (courtesy of 18seven’s genius) and change “disk0s1” to your own EFI partition label.
This is what should’ve seen in Terminal: [2 part B]
> Now, time to add a the Boot.plist to EFI:
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Bootplist
./update-1s1.sh
> Again, you can use the ./update-2s1.sh script that’s also included, or you can edit the script to match your setup.
This is what should’ve seen in Terminal: [2 part C]
fdisk -e /dev/disk1
p
f 1 (space between “f” and “1”)
w
y
q
> This makes EFI active.
You should’ve seen something like this in terminal: [3 part A]
You have just made a bootable Snow Leo Installer from your external HDD and configured EFI boot at the same time.
This will also serve as your external bootloader from here on.
B. Install Snow Leopard onto the HP Mini
1. With the USB installer plugged in, switch on the Mini and press F9 as it starts. You’ll see the boot menu screen. Use the up/down arrow keys to choose your USB Installer from the list and hit the Enter key. Wait until Darwin finish its countdown and boot “Mac OS X Install DVD” partition and get you into the Installer Program.
2. Choose your preferred language etc. On the Menubar, go to Utilities > Disk Utility. Format the Mini’s internal HDD as GUID & Mac OS Extended (Journaled). Let’s assume it’s named as “Macintosh HD”. Quit Disk Utility.
3. Choose Mac HD as the destination partition for installation. You can click on the Customize button at the lower left corner to specify which components you want to install. Note: Normally, I opt to exclude printer drivers, all other languages, X11 to save more hard disk real estate and include Rosetta (for MS Office:Mac, it isn’t Universal binary yet) and QuickTime Player 7, but it’s all up to you.
4. Click on OK, then click on the Install button the start installing Mac OS X on the HP Mini. Walk around, grab some Starbucks, read a book, anything – just don’t try to blow dry your hair anywhere near the HP Mini while it’s installing OS X hahaha . The HP Mini will restart after it’s finished installing. Note: The Installer program might tell you that the installation failed. Don’t worry about that – it’s just saying the system it has just installed can’t be restarted. But we have an external bootloader made just for that.
Post-Installation
A. Initial Snow Leopard boot and user account creation.
1. With your external bootloader still plugged in, hit F9 as the Mini starts up, choose your external HDD and press Enter. Chameleon will kick in but before the countdown is over, press any key. Arrow key to choose “Macintosh HD” (where you’ve just installed Snow Leo on your Mini’s internal HDD) and then Enter.
> Now here’s a somewhat tricky part where most of us part ways. If you get through the Setup Assistant fine and configured your user account (normally you’d even see the Welcome video and with audio at that) then jump to part B of this Post-Installation. However, if you get stuck then:
2. Force restart the Mini. F9 and arrow up/down to choose your external HDD and let Chameleon boot again into the the “Mac OS X Install DVD”. Choose your preferred language and once you see the Menu bar, go to Utilities > Reset password. Enter a password for root and remember that password. Quit the Mac OS X Install program and restart the Mini.
3. Again, with your external bootloader still plugged in, hit F9 as the Mini starts up, choose your external HDD and press Enter. Chameleon will kick in but before the countdown is over, press any key. Arrow key to choose “Macintosh HD”. Type in “root” as user name and the password you created earlier, login and configure your user account.
B. Make your HP Mini able to boot Snow Leopard up on its own
1. As you’re logged into Snow Leo with your user account, unzip “SnowLeo_EFIboot” package. Again, we’re assuming it’s been put in / for easier typing in Terminal. Actually, we’re just gonna do what we did a while ago (or a long while ago depending on your experience) with your external HDD to make it bootable, albeit with some changes. But these are very very minor changes.
2. Setup your EFI partition. Launch Terminal:
sudo -s
(type in your admin account’s password)
diskutil list
> Remember what we talked about earlier? Your Mini’s HDD will normally be referenced as “/dev/disk0”. Since we’ve formatted it during install as GPT (GUID partition table), you’d see an “EFI /dev/disk0s1” entry before your “Macintosh HD /dev/disk0s2”.
This is that very very minor change I was talking about; you’re just gonna be changing all the “/dev/disk1s1” or “/dev/disk2s1” references you used before to “/dev/disk0s1”.
(You’ve done this before, you can definitely do this again. :D)
newfs_hfs -v EFI /dev/disk0s1
mkdir /Volumes/EFI
mount_hfs /dev/disk0s1 /Volumes/EFI
mkdir -p /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Extensions
mkdir /Volumes/EFI/Extra/Themes
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r658-bin/i386
fdisk -f boot0 -u -y /dev/rdisk0
dd if=boot1h of=/dev/rdisk0s1
cp boot /Volumes/EFI
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Cham2RC3-r568-bin/OptionalExtras
cp -R smbios.plist Themes /Volumes/EFI/Extra
umount -f /Volumes/EFI
rm -rf /Volumes/EFI
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./27ae.sh
> We used the update-1s1.sh script before, so now we’ll use the default “update.sh” scripts (thanks again to 18seven for this)
./update.sh
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Bootplist
./update.sh
fdisk -e /dev/disk0
p
f 1
w
y
q
Your MacBook Mini has been Snow Leopardized and is now bootable but we’d want to tweak further; ex. sleep, UUID etc.
C. Tweaks and Stuff
Download TextWrangler and install it.
1. Enable Sleep.
-While still on sudo inside Terminal:
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/DSDT
./update.sh
> This installs dspassmor’s dsdt.aml that enables sleep on the Mini.
2. Cnfigure your UUID.
– Get your ethernet’s MAC address via System Profiler > Network (in Leopard). Cmd+C to copy the MAC address.
– In Finder, open /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts, right click UUID.kext > Show package contents. In the resulting window, in Contents folder, open info.plist with TextWrangler.
– In TextWrangler, locate “UUID-key” and replace the last set of numbers in the string below by pasting your MAC address over. Delete all the “:” colons. Save changes to info.plist. [http://photoshroom.com/photos/dixneuf/efi_snowleo/UUID_infoplist_MACadd.png]
– Go back to Terminal:
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./update.sh
> This loads your newly edited UUID.kext onto EFI.
3. Configure Boot plist
– Get your “Macintosh HD” partition’s Universal Unique Identifier via Disk Utility > right click “Macintosh HD” > Information. Cmd+C to copy the number.
– In Finder, go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Bootplist and open com.apple.Boot.plist with TextWrangler. Then create a new key after the “device-properties” in the file. Save the changes to com.apple.Boot.plist. [http://photoshroom.com/photos/dixneuf/efi_snowleo/comappleBootplist_UnivUniqueID.png]
– Go back to Terminal:
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/Bootplist
./update.sh
> This updates your com.apple.Boot.plist on your EFI partition.
4. Trackpad (Default; ApplePS2Controller).
– Go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/PrefPanes/Synaptics and “Synaptics Trackpad.prefPane” to /Library/PreferencePanes/
> This ensures that you get a Trackpad pref pane in System Preferences if you decided to stick with the default ApplePS2Controllers.
5. Trackpad (VoodooPS2Controller).If you wanna switch to VoodooPS2Controllers, then
– Go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/OtherKexts and copy VoodooPS2Controller and VoodooPS2Trackpad kexts to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts. Put ApplePS2Controller and AppleACPIPS2Nub kexts to into /SnowLeo_EFIboot/_disabled/ folder. Go back to Terminal:
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./update.sh
– Go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/PrefPanes/VoodooPrefs and double click on VoodooPS2.prefPane to install it.
6. Tweak VoodooHDA.
– Install by double-clickng VoodooHDA.prefPane in /SnowLeo_EFIboot/PrefPanes/VoodooPrefs
– Install by double-clicking voodoohdahelper in /SnowLeo_EFIboot/PrefPanes/VoodooPrefs/helper
7. Transform your Mini into a MacBook Air.
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/MBAsmbiosplsit
./update.sh
8. Install ClamshellDisplay.
– In Finder, go to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/ClamShellDisplay and copy ClamshellDisplay.kext to /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts.
sudo -s (again and re-enter password if you hadn’t left it open)
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./update.sh
> This loads this kext to EFI to keep your 100% Vanilla setup.
– Or you can directly install it to /System/Library/Extensions. That’ll leave you with a 99.9% Vanilla install.
9. Update to 10.6.1
– Download, install the updater and before restarting, go to Terminal:
sudo -s
cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts
./27ae.sh
> This re-patches the video drivers – only as a precautionary measure in case something happens after the point update; we just wanna be sure.
Now what?
You’ve got a working MacBook Mini with Snow Leopard. You’re also EFI booting so if you wanna make changes – swap kexts, etc – you don’t have to muck with the /System/Library/Extensions folder anymore, leaving you with a solid, stable system. All changes are made in the EFI partition.
Also the update scripts are very handy (again kudos to 18seven for making them). Should you wanna change a component in EFI, go and dump the new kext in the “HPMiniKexts” folder, moving any conflicting kexts in the “_disabled” folder within, and finally, in Terminal, cd /SnowLeo_EFIboot/HPMiniKexts and ./update.sh.
For the other components, it’s basically the same principle – copy/edit the component in the appropriate folder and then update in Terminal.
Ex. dsdt’s go to the “DSDT” folder, com.apple.Boot.plist goes to the “Biosplist” folder in the SnowLeo_EFIboot main.
And then if you’re quite up to it, get to the DSDT patching/hacking route. Make the jump to this link to read up on the topic.




Cat in the Bag: Install Snow Leopard on the HP Mini

20 09 2009
This installation method uses NetbookBootMaker. With Chameleon 2.0-RC2 already available, you might be asking why NetbookBootMaker? True, NetbookBootMaker is primarily made for the Dell Mini hackintosh but it works fine in my setup and offers noob-friendly tools as well such as ExtraUpdate – more on that later.
So, let’s get this rollin’! 😀
1. Create a bootable Snow Leopard USB/External HDD installer
What you need : a hackintosh/real Mac, Snow Leopard Retail DVD.dmg image, USB/External HDD (at least 8 gb), NetbookBootMaker
With your drive (USB/External HDD) plugged in, launch Disk Utility (Applications > Utilities ) and format it. Let’s assume we’d named the USB/HDD partition as “DVD Snow Leo”.
Note: I normally use GUID & Mac OS Extended (Journaled).
Still in Disk Utility, click on the Restore tab. Drag the Snow Leo image (“Mac OS X Install DVD”) into the Source field. Then drag “DVD Snow Leo” into the Destination: field. Click on the Restore button and wait until the process completes. Quit Disk Utility.
Note: If the Snow Leo Retail DVD image is not listed at the left pane, simply drag the image there from a Finder window, or Click on the Image… button beside the Source field to navigate to the image’s location in your hard drive.
Launch NetbookBootMaker. Select “DVD Snow Leo” as target drive from the dropdown menu. Click on Prepare Boot Drive and wait till the patching finishes. Quit NetbookBootMaker.
In a Finder window, Shift+Cmd+G to access /Volumes/DVD Snow Leo/System/Installation/Packages. You should see 3 “OSInstall” files: OSInstall.mpkg, OSInstall.pkg, OSInstall.pkg.orig.
Delete OSInstall.pkg. Rename OSInstall.pkg.orig, taking out the “.orig” extension so it becomes “OSInstall.pkg”. You’ve made your
Note: NetbookBootMaker altered the default OSInstall.pkg file so, basically, what we’re doing here is just restoring the default OSInstall.pkg.
2. Install Mac OS X Snow Leopard onto the HP Mini
What you need: Snow Leo USB Installer (that you’ve just created in part 1), HP Mini (this is tested on the 1000)
With the USB installer plugged in, switch on the Mini and press F9 as it starts.
You’ll see the boot menu screen. Use the up/down arrow keys to choose your USB Installer from the list and hit the Enter key. Wait until Darwin finish its countdown and boot into the Installer Program.
Choose your preferred language etc. On the Menubar, go to Utilities > Disk Utility. Format the Mini’s internal HDD as GUID & Mac OS Extended (Journaled). Let’s assume it’s named as “Mac HD”. Quit Disk Utility.
Choose Mac HD as the destination partition for installation. You can click on the Customize button at the lower left corner to specify which components you want to install.
Note: Normally, I opt to exclude printer drivers, all other languages, X11 to save more hard disk real estate and include Rosetta (for MS Office:Mac, it isn’t Universal binary yet) and Quick Time Player 7, but it’s all up to you.
Click on OK, then click on the Install button the start installing Mac OS X on the HP Mini. Walk around, grab some Starbucks, read a book, anything – just don’t try to blow dry your hair anywhere near the HP Mini while it’s installing OS X hahaha ;). The HP Mini will restart after it’s finished installing.
Note: Installation won’t stall anymore because of what we did a while ago with the OSInstall files.
3. Post-install tweaks
What you need: NetbookBootMaker, GeneralExtensions kext bundle
When the HP Mini restarts and with the USB Installer still plugged in, press F9 to boot with the USB installer once more. But before Darwin loads the Snow Leopard Installer Program again, press any key to interrupt the bootloader. Arrow up/down to choose Mac HD and hit Enter.
Note: We just used the USB Installer’s bootloader (which is Chameleon 2.0-RC2) to boot up the internal HDD.
After the Welcome video (yes, you’ll get to see it) and configure your user account and other settings in the Setup Assistant. You’ll then be brought into the Snow Leopard Desktop.
Note: There’s noticeable “lag” when you click on Continue at the Do not transfer my information now part in Setup Assistant but it’s just normal as Mac OS X is trying to setup your network (because it’s already recognized the Mini 1000’s Broadcom WiFi module as AirPort). Just go on following this:
> Different Network Setup > My computer does connect to the internet > Continue
Once you’re inside Snow Leopard, launch NetbookBootMaker. Select Mac HD from the dropdown menu and click on Prepare Boot Drive. Quit NetbookBootMaker when patching is finished.
Note: Your Mac HD/internal HDD will already be bootable by now and resolution will already be correct at 1024 x 600, Keyboard & Trackpad, Bluetooth and WiFi working. there are still some tweaking to do; kexts to install to provide support for the Mini’s other hardware – get sound, correct some power/battery related issues.
In a Finder window, Shift+Cmd+G to open the /System/Library/Extensions/. Delete AppleHDA.kext
Note: This is done so that the VoodooHDA kext which will be installed later will work.
After that, Shift+Cmd+G to open the /Extra/ folder. Delete the Themes folder entirely.
Note: Deleting this folder corrects the Apple logo’s image ratio during the Apple bootsplash.
Unzip the GeneralExtensions folder and copy it to /Extra/, replacing the existing GeneralExtensions folder in there.
Launch the ExtraUpdate app inside the /Extra/ – the one with the rubber shoe icon. Click on Update Extensions. Restart.
Note: During the update, the app will mount the ramdisk, so you’ll its icon popping up in your Desktop. You’ll know that the update is completed when this ramdisk is unmounted and the Update Extensions button is no longer recessed.
Congratulations! You’re now runnning Snow Leopard on your MacBook Mini. 😀
Optional: Use VoodooPS2 instead of ApplePS2
What you need: VoodooPS2Controller-0.98 installer.pkg
In order to maximize your use of the Mini’s Synaptics trackpad, i.e. side-scrolling and tap-clicking, you need to install VoodooPS2Controller instead of the ApplePS2Controller (which is already, working fine so it’s up to you if want to leave it that way).
Unzip and run the VoodooPS2Controller installer package. Tick the checkbox for the Trackpad. Click on Install.
In a Finder window, Shift+Cmd+Go to /System/Library/Extensions/ and copy the VoodooPS2Controller.kext. After copying it, delete the kext from the Extensions folder, authenticating as you go.
Shift+Cmd+G to /Extra/GeneralExtensions/ and paste the VoodooPS2Controller.kext in there. Delete AppleACPIPS2Nub.kext and ApplePS2Controller.kext. Again, authenticate as prompted.
Note: VoodooPS2Controller doesn’t need AppleACPIPS2Nub.kext. As a matter of fact, you’ll most probably get a kernel panic if you keep the Nub kext. ApplePS2Controller’s function will be taken over by VoodooPS2Controller anyway so we can delete it as well.
Shift+Cmd+G again to /Extra/ and launch the UpdateExtra app again. Click on the Update Extensions. Wait for it to finish. Restart to begin using the new kexts.
So you’re on Snow Leopard. You’ll find that pretty much everything works – except for Sleep/Resume and the internal mic.
The VoodooHDA kext used in this guide is not the newer version which supposedly makes the internal mic work. I’ve tried it on my Mini 1001TU but doesn’t work for me, but it might for you. You can download it from the Voodoolabs page and install the PrefPane and replace the kext in your /Extra/GeneralExtensions/ folder, updating the extensions using the ExtraUpdate app.
This ExtraUpdate app is one of the reasons why I chose to go with NetbookBootMaker, that and the fact that with it the installation/customization process is almost an entirely GUI approach – it’s very noob friendly.
As for the Sleep/Resume issue, you may notice that we’ve included the SleepEnabler kext in this method even though it doesn’t work – the Mini “goes to sleep” but it immediately wakes up so technically, it doesn’t get to sleep ever. But at least, that’s better than having to force shutdown/restart the Mini because it’s gone comatose when you accidently close the lid, or forget to configure settings in Sys Pref > Enery Saver to make the Mini insomniac. 😉

This installation method uses NetbookBootMaker. With Chameleon 2.0-RC2 already available, you might be asking why NetbookBootMaker? True, NetbookBootMaker is primarily made for the Dell Mini hackintosh but it works fine in my setup and offers noob-friendly tools as well such as ExtraUpdate – more on that later.

So, let’s get this rollin’! 😀

Create a bootable Snow Leopard USB/External HDD installer

What you need : a hackintosh/real Mac, Snow Leopard Retail DVD.dmg image, USB/External HDD (at least 8 gb)

Download: > NetbookBootMaker <

  1. With your drive (USB/External HDD) plugged in, launch Disk Utility (Applications > Utilities) and format it. Let’s assume we’d named the USB/HDD partition as “DVD Snow Leo”. Note: I normally use GUID & Mac OS Extended (Journaled).
  2. Still in Disk Utility, click on the Restore tab. Drag the Snow Leo image (“Mac OS X Install DVD”) into the Source field. Then drag “DVD Snow Leo” into the Destination: field. Click on the Restore button and wait until the process completes. Quit Disk Utility. Note: If the Snow Leo Retail DVD image is not listed at the left pane, simply drag the image there from a Finder window, or Click on the Image… button beside the Source field to navigate to the image’s location in your hard drive.
  3. Launch NetbookBootMaker. Select “DVD Snow Leo” as target drive from the dropdown menu. Click on Prepare Boot Drive and wait till the patching finishes. Quit NetbookBootMaker.
  4. In a Finder window, Shift+Cmd+G to access /Volumes/DVD Snow Leo/System/Installation/Packages. You should see (3) three “OSInstall” files in there: OSInstall.mpkg, OSInstall.pkg, OSInstall.pkg.orig.
  5. Delete OSInstall.pkg. Rename OSInstall.pkg.orig, taking out the “.orig” extension so it becomes “OSInstall.pkg”. Voilà, you’ve made your own USB Installer. Note: NetbookBootMaker altered the default OSInstall.pkg file so, basically, what we’re doing here is just restoring the default OSInstall.pkg.

Install Mac OS X Snow Leopard onto the HP Mini

What you need: Snow Leo USB Installer (that you’ve just created in part one of this guide), HP Mini (this is tested on the 1000)

  1. With the USB installer plugged in, switch on the Mini and press F9 as it starts. You’ll see the boot menu screen. Use the up/down arrow keys to choose your USB Installer from the list and hit the Enter key. Wait until Darwin finish its countdown and boot into the Mac OS X Installer Program.
  2. Choose your preferred language etc. On the Menubar, go to Utilities > Disk Utility. Format the Mini’s internal HDD as GUID & Mac OS Extended (Journaled). Let’s assume it’s named as “Macintosh HD”. Quit Disk Utility.
  3. Choose Mac HD as the destination partition for installation. You can click on the Customize button at the lower left corner to specify which components you want to install. Note: Normally, I opt to exclude printer drivers, all other languages, X11 to save more hard disk real estate and include Rosetta (for MS Office:Mac, it isn’t Universal binary yet) and QuickTime Player 7, but it’s all up to you.
  4. Click on OK, then click on the Install button the start installing Mac OS X on the HP Mini. Walk around, grab some Starbucks, read a book, anything – just don’t try to blow dry your hair anywhere near the HP Mini while it’s installing OS X hahaha ;). The HP Mini will restart after it’s finished installing. Note: Installation won’t stall anymore because of what we did a while ago with the OSInstall files.

Post-install Tweaks/Configs

Download: > NetbookBootMaker <, > GeneralExtensions kext bundle <, > About This Mac.pkg <

  1. When the HP Mini restarts and with the USB Installer still plugged in, press F9 to boot with the USB installer once more. But before Darwin loads the Snow Leopard Installer Program again, press any key to interrupt the bootloader. Arrow up/down to choose Macintosh HD and hit Enter. Note: We just used the USB Installer’s bootloader (which is Chameleon 2.0-RC2) to boot up the internal HDD.
  2. After the Welcome video (yes, you’ll get to see it) and configure your user account and other settings in the Setup Assistant. You’ll then be brought into the Snow Leopard Desktop. Note: There’s noticeable “lag” when you click on Continue at the Do not transfer my information now part in Setup Assistant but it’s just normal as Mac OS X is trying to setup your network (because it’s already recognized the Mini 1000’s Broadcom WiFi module as AirPort). Just go on following this: > Different Network Setup > My computer does connect to the internet > Continue
  3. Once you’re inside Snow Leopard, launch NetbookBootMaker. Select Macintosh HD from the dropdown menu and click on Prepare Boot Drive. Quit NetbookBootMaker when patching is finished. Note: Your Macintosh HD/internal HDD will already be bootable by now and resolution will already be correct at 1024 x 600, Keyboard & Trackpad, Bluetooth and WiFi working. there are still some tweaking to do; kexts to install to provide support for the Mini’s other hardware – get sound, correct some power/battery related issues.
  4. In a Finder window, Shift+Cmd+G to open the /System/Library/Extensions/. Delete AppleHDA.kext. Note: This is done so that the VoodooHDA kext which will be installed later will work.
  5. After that, Shift+Cmd+G to open the /Extra/ folder. Delete the Themes folder entirely. Note: Deleting this folder corrects the Apple logo’s image ratio during the Apple bootsplash.
  6. Unzip the GeneralExtensions folder and copy the whole folder to /Extra/, replacing the existing GeneralExtensions folder in there.
  7. Launch the ExtraUpdate app inside the /Extra/ – the one with the rubber shoe icon. Click on Update Extensions. Restart. Note: During the update, the app will mount the ramdisk, so you’ll its icon popping up in your Desktop. You’ll know that the update is completed when this ramdisk is unmounted and the Update Extensions button is no longer recessed.
  8. Unzip and run the AboutThisMac.pkg to correct the CPU and RAM information on the “About This Mac” window. Note: The CPU clock is already properly recognized as well as the amount of ram, so this is purely cosmetic.

Congratulations! You’re now runnning Snow Leopard on your MacBook Mini. 😀

Optional: Use VoodooPS2Controller instead of ApplePS2Controller

Download: > VoodooPS2Controller-0.98 installer.pkg <

In order to maximize your use of the Mini’s Synaptics trackpad, i.e. side-scrolling and tap-clicking, you need to install VoodooPS2Controller instead of the ApplePS2Controller (which is already, working fine so it’s up to you if want to leave it that way).

  1. Unzip and run the VoodooPS2Controller installer package. Tick the checkbox for the Trackpad. Click on Install.
  2. In a Finder window, Shift+Cmd+G to get to /System/Library/Extensions/ and copy the VoodooPS2Controller.kext. After copying it, delete the kext from the Extensions folder, authenticating as you go.
  3. Shift+Cmd+G to /Extra/GeneralExtensions/ and paste the VoodooPS2Controller.kext in there. Delete AppleACPIPS2Nub.kext and ApplePS2Controller.kext. Again, authenticate as prompted. Note: VoodooPS2Controller doesn’t need AppleACPIPS2Nub.kext. As a matter of fact, you’ll most probably get a kernel panic if you keep the Nub kext. ApplePS2Controller’s function will be taken over by VoodooPS2Controller anyway so we can delete it as well.
  4. Shift+Cmd+G again to /Extra/ and launch the UpdateExtra app again. Click on the Update Extensions. Wait for it to finish. Restart to begin using the new kexts.

Final words. . .

So you’re on Snow Leopard. You’ll find that pretty much everything works – except for Sleep/Resume and the internal mic.

The VoodooHDA kext used in this guide is not the newer version which supposedly makes the internal mic work. I’ve tried it on my Mini 1001TU but doesn’t work for me, but it might for you. You can download it from here and install the PrefPane and replace the kext in your /Extra/GeneralExtensions/ folder. Don’t forget to update the extensions using the ExtraUpdate app.

This ExtraUpdate app is one of the reasons why I chose to go with NetbookBootMaker, that and the fact that with it the installation/customization process is almost an entirely GUI approach – it’s very noob friendly.

As for the Sleep/Resume issue, you may notice that we’ve included the SleepEnabler kext in this method even though it doesn’t work – the Mini “goes to sleep” but it immediately wakes up so technically, it doesn’t get to sleep ever. But at least, that’s better than having to force shutdown/restart the Mini because it’s gone comatose when you accidently close the lid, or forget to configure settings in System Preferences > Energy Saver to make the Mini insomniac. 😉